Top Four Tools for Removing Cat Hair and How to Use Them

Top Four Tools for Removing Cat Hair and How to Use Them

cat hair removal

As much as we love our cats, finding their hair in all sorts of places around the house is not the best experience one can have as an owner. It gets even a bit more irritating when you know there are some in the sheets or stuck in your pillows but you can’t seem to get them out.

Such annoyances can happen even with shorthairs. Despite that, it is important to know that shedding is a healthy and natural process. We humans do it too (albeit in a way that doesn’t make as much of a mess). The truly best option is to get a hair cleaner that does the right job! Here are the top three most popular types of cleaners you can try to keep your house free from a hairy situation.

 

#1. Sticky Brushes

Using adhesives, these brushes are arguably the most effective at rooting out and pulling out stray strands from areas where they can be difficult to spot (such as sofas, sheets and curtains that share similar colours as your cat’s fur).

These tend to come in one or two shapes. Sometimes it’s like a roller, other times it’s more like a brush. The only true downside, however, is the adhesive itself. More often, you wouldn’t want one that might have harmful or non-environment friendly chemicals. They also need to be replaced regularly.

Setting that aside though, they can be a quick and powerful fix if your cat often sheds around things that would be difficult to wash hair off of.

 

#2. Non-Stick Rollers

While some rollers use adhesives, non-adhesive variants do exist and they deserve a category of their own. Plenty of them is cleverly designed to pull up and pick up hair from fabrics like those in carpets, couches and beds. These can be reused without any sort of refills and are durable enough to last a lifetime.

You might even find them a bit easier to use than adhesive (which can sometimes be fickle if they prove stickier than expected). Simply roll back and forth until no traces of hair are left.

 

#3. Cat Brush Glove

These types of brushes have been trending for a while and with a good reason. It conveniently turns your own hand into a brush and you can simply start sweeping the hair off with the palm of your hand.

Even more convenient is that it doubles as a grooming tool as well! Grooming is highly regarded as the better prevention method for shedding cats. Therefore, grabbing one of these gloves means you’re hitting two birds with one stone!

 

#4. Vacuum Cleaners

Don’t just get any vacuum cleaner though! There is, indeed, a standard for what you should buy if you think a vacuum cleaner could include cat hair in its list of things to clean. Generally, you would need a really powerful one to get all the hairs wedged deep inside pillows, carpets and other upholstery.

It also depends on your cat’s habits and where they most likely leave hair. If it’s just on the rugs, then suction power is all you have to think about. But if they are just shedding all over the place, then you’ll need a vacuum that can be used on sofas as well as carpets.

There are certainly a lot more options out there than what are listed here. As far as budget goes, the brush glove and the non-adhesive rollers are your best bet, requiring just a little bit of effort. The vacuum and adhesive brushes might be a bit more costly but they can be worth the cost too. Whichever you choose though, you can be sure that they are all great tools for ridding your house from all that shedded fuzz!

The Basics of Feline Nutrition: Or, Knowing What to Feed Your Cat

The Basics of Feline Nutrition: Or, Knowing What to Feed Your Cat

Here’s a little tidbit of info: if your cat gets sick often, it might be because of the food he eats. The health, and even the life span, of your cat depends on what you feed him. Thus, it is important that you feed your pet a high-quality diet that is in accordance with his specific nutritional requirements.

feline nutrition

So what should you feed your little Toby? And how much and how frequently? Read on to learn more about feline nutrition basics.

It depends on how old your cat is.
  • Kittens are highly active, and thus, they require a diet that is high in fat and protein, which they need if they were to develop strong teeth, bones, and muscles.
  • Adult cats typically require lower-calorie diets than kittens. With older cats, weight control is the primary consideration, as they can fall prey to diseases that plague adult humans, such as cardiovascular diseases, arthritis, and diabetes.
  • Elderly cats are a lot less active compared to their younger counterparts and thus require a diet low on fat but rich in easily digestible proteins so as to make the process of digestion easier on their kidneys.
Check the label.

When buying cat food, make sure to check the label. All the necessary nutritional elements should be there. The following are the most important:

  • Protein – These should come from meat, poultry, or fish sources.
  • Taurine – This is an essential amino acid that plays a crucial role in various physiological functions in animals.
  • Water – This is the lifeblood of the planet and of every living creature on it.
  • Minerals, vitamins, fatty acids, and enzymes – Check with your pet’s vet as to which elements you should look out for.
Know what to avoid.

Cats are curious creatures, and sometimes this may lead them to eat certain types of harmful foods. As their human, it is your responsibility to look out for them and to steer them clear of the following foods:

  • Chocolate – While humans love this, it can be lethal for your cats. It contains theobromine, a toxic agent that can cause seizures, tremors, and even death.
  • Alcohol – It only takes a minimal amount of alcohol to harm your pet—even a couple of teaspoons of hard liquor can cause a cat to become comatose!
  • Milk – Let this become your signal to stop giving your cat that saucer of milk at dinner—cats are actually lactose-intolerant. If your cat often suffers from diarrhea, this might be the cause.

There are a lot more foods that are harmful to your cat. Get in touch with your vet to find out what the rest of them are.

When it comes to being a pet owner, it pays to be informed and aware. It is always better to prevent the possibility of the disease rather than cure already-existing symptoms. If you give your beloved pet an appropriate and well-balanced diet, that could make a lot of difference with regard to his health.

Planning the Diet of a Pregnant Cat

Planning the Diet of a Pregnant Cat

The proper planning of a pregnant cat’s diet ensures that she gives birth to healthy kittens and that she herself will have enough strength to give birth and nurse the newborns. While the food that you usually give to an adult cat is good for her daily needs, it is unable to provide the boost she needs when expecting. As such, you will need to choose food which meets her new needs.

pregnant cat

Specifically, you will need high-quality kitten food, the only type of food that provides the pregnant cat with protein, calories, and all the nutrients she will need. For best results, make sure to begin feeding her that type of cat food from mating until the kittens are a few weeks old. Spend up to ten days gradually adding kitten food to her usual adult food, until such time that her taste buds have fully adjusted to kitten food. By doing the above, the adult cat is not only strong but also has enough energy to support her newborn kittens. The above can also help assure you that the food is actually consumed, and nothing is wasted.

In case the pregnant cat’s stomach is sensitive, select a delicate formula. If she is required only a specific diet, talk to your veterinarian for advice prior to making the necessary changes.

When determining whether you should get wet food or dry food, it’s essential to keep in mind that the latter contains more calories than the former. So if your pet only eats wet food or is required to only eat wet food, you may need to feed her larger servings so she gets the right amount of energy. For some cats, a good approach is to mix dry and wet food together.

Like in the case of human females, the intake of a pregnant kitty gradually increases, beginning from mating day until her pregnancy ends. But towards the end of her term, mum will lose appetite a bit. This sign means labour is close. Meals should still be kept close to her at this time in case she would want small snacks.

Once her term ends, don’t be surprised if she will consume fifty percent more than normal or more. There is no need to worry about overfeeding, though. Kitty will just consume as much as she needs, and no more.

Speaking of the amount of meals she needs, you will need to give her many small meals over the course of a single day. To save time, you can make meals and fresh water accessible all the time so she can eat and drink when needed.

That said, you can expect the mother cat’s weight to increase throughout her pregnancy and beyond it. This will be useful, as some of the weight will be the fat layers that she lays down on when nursing the little kitties. So there really is no reason to worry about obesity; this excess weight should go away eventually during her nursing period, which lasts up to four weeks.

Tips on Teeth Care for Kittens

Tips on Teeth Care for Kittens

Our feline friends are just as likely to suffer from dental diseases as their humans. In fact, dental disease is one of the most common health problems affecting cats. It can cause not only mouth and tooth pain but can also lead to more serious issues like kidney problems and heart conditions.

teeth care for kitten

So when is the right time to start thinking about dental care for cats? Most animal health experts would tell you that the earlier you start the better. A practically nonexistent toothbrushing routine is said to be the cause of gum and tooth disease even in small animals like cats, and if you wait until they’re much older, the problem may have already started without you even being aware of it. Thus, it is best to start brushing their teeth at a young age.

There’s another advantage to introducing your kittens to regular dental habits at an early stage in their life: this allows them to get used to the process, and so they won’t be that intimidated anymore with what will have been a normal, everyday routine to them. Also, it helps if you take note of the following tips that will make the process of everyday brushing easier for you and your feline friend:

  • Get your kitten used to having his mouth and teeth gently handled on a regular basis. You can brush a fingertip applicator across his teeth so he can get used to the feel and taste of being brushed. But note that you should never brush milk teeth. When he is teething, your cat will have sore gums, and brushing his teeth at this stage will only teach him to think that brushing is painful. Have your kitten checked by your veterinarian first, and when your vet gives you the go signal, that’s when you start on your kitten’s brushing routine.
  • Orient yourself with a variety of toothbrushing styles that you can use on cats and choose the style that your kitten is most comfortable with. Also, make sure that you use a toothpaste made especially for cats as the made-for-humans kind can prove toxic to them.
  • Get your cat’s teeth regularly checked by your veterinarian. These dental checkups should occur every six to twelve months, although your cat will need to undergo more frequent and more thorough examinations if he ever develops dental disease.
  • Consider your kitten’s everyday diet as what he puts into his mouth and chews is just as important as maintaining a regular brushing routine. Dental chews and specially formulated dry food diets will also help to prevent gum and tooth disease.
  • Look out for danger signs of dental disease, some of which will include drooling, tartar, bad breath, red gums, and an inability or a refusal to eat. But take note that cats can also be great pretenders—that is, they can show no indications of a dental disease even when they’re already in great pain. This again reiterates the importance of regular visits to your veterinarian.

In order to prevent serious dental health issues in your kitten, it is crucial that you practice the habit of checking him regularly for any untoward changes or indications of problems. Be vigilant, as your cat won’t be able to tell you if he’s in a lot of pain or is feeling unwell.

Kitten Grooming Basics

Kitten Grooming Basics

By starting the habit of grooming kitty cat early enough, she will learn to love getting groomed. In fact, it’s not unheard of for many kitties to love grooming time so much that they will come running to their owners when they are seen with brushes on their hands.

But before you pick up the brush, you need to keep one thing in mind: kittens, like their adult counterparts, can groom themselves just fine. Their tongues are designed to serve as mini-brushes that can remove loose hair and evenly distribute oils throughout their coats. But this does not mean that a kitty cat won’t appreciate any form of help, like in the removal of knots from her coat.

What are the Best Ways to Help Kitty Groom Herself?

Brushing

In the case of short-haired kittens, they only require a quick brushing once a week. However, long-coated breeds like the Persian will need daily brushing.

  • Begin by placing kitty on the lap and gently brushing her coat. Make sure to praise her for being well-behaved in a soothing voice.
  • Stroke her coat after two minutes. Hand a treat to her as a reward for the short brushing session.
  • Repeat many times in a day, making sure to gradually increase brushing time length.

cat grooming

Kittens generally require a significant amount of time to get used to a grooming routine. So if, after five days, you believe kitty has become familiar with the feeling of brushing, begin grooming kittens’ sensitive areas such as the belly, ears, and tail. During the first few sessions of brushing these parts, be extra careful and keep these sessions brief. Start grooming the back if you notice any sign of aggression or boredom.

Nail Care

Rarely do healthy kittens need nail care since they care for their nails when they do a myriad of activities such as scratching things and climbing trees. In the case of indoor and older cats, however, their nails need to be clipped on a regular basis.

Nails, particularly the back paws, need to be checked once a week. If these show at rest, then they need to be trimmed. You or a veterinarian can do this task, and if you have decided that you will be doing it yourself, then make sure that the paw pads are checked for foreign bodies, cuts, and soreness. If anything unusual is found, contact the vet immediately.

Bathing

Many short-haired felines do fine without taking a bath, although there are times when a quick dip might be necessary. As for show cats and the long-coated ones, however, they will need to get bathed frequently. Thus, long-coated and show cats should be used to occasional warm baths while still at a young age.

Like with nail care, you or a vet can bathe a cat. If you have decided that you should be doing this task, highlighted below are a few things you can do:

  • Thoroughly groom the coat to remove all knots. Tangled coats are difficult to manage when wet.
  • A rubber mat must then be placed at the bottom part of the sink.
  • Fill half the sink with warm water. A nozzle spray must then be attached to the taps.
  • Ready the towel and cat shampoo so you need not walk far when they are needed.
  • Hold kitty firmly but gently when placing her in the sink. Wet her coat immediately afterwards.
  • Apply shampoo, then thoroughly rinse.
  • Dry kitty accordingly. If she has a long coat, blow-dry as you brush her.
  • Check the sink and the water in it for the presence of parasites.
Making a Home Relocation Easier on Your Cat

Making a Home Relocation Easier on Your Cat

moving house with a cat

As a cat owner, maybe you already know that cats—well, most of them—don’t like change. They like being in comfortable and familiar spaces, and anything new gives them anxiety. However, at some points in your life, you would probably have to move homes. When this happens, it is crucial that you prepare your cat for the relocation so it will be a stress-free move for him:

Before the Move
  • Give your cat the opportunity to be familiar with his carrier so he won’t make a fuss when you put him in it on the actual moving day. Leave it open and place a bed for your cat in it. You may also leave a few treats in it in order to entice your cat inside the carrier. Gradually introduce the habit of feeding your cat inside his carrier. For instance, you may start by placing his food dish near the carrier at first and slowly work your way inside.
  • While you’re packing, enclose your cat inside a quiet room far from all the noise and activity, which could possibly make him anxious. It might also be be a good idea to get him familiar with your moving boxes.
  • Even while you’re busy with all the packing, try not to change your cat’s routine too much. Keep to his regular feeding and playing schedule. Give him the same amount of attention. You can use a feeder with a timer functionality to make sure that he eats at regular times.
On the Day of the Move
  • Moving day is a busy day, and your family members and the moving crew will be going in and out of the house. To prevent your cat from getting anxious and dashing outside during this busy time, you can enclose him in a small, quiet space such as a bathroom with his bed, litter box, water, and food. Make sure you put a sign informing everyone to keep the door shut and to be silent as they pass that area to ensure that he really stays inside.
  • While you are traveling, your cat is sure to get very anxious and scared. However, try to resist opening his carrier in order to comfort him as he might dash out. You should only open his carrier when you arrive at your destination.
After the Move
  • Take your cat right away to a relatively quiet room inside your new house. Set up his food and water containers as well as his bed and litter box. Make this his home base for a few days while you and your family are busy unpacking. Keeping him in this quiet space for a few days will allow him to get used to the new environment gradually.
  • When you are done with the unpacking and you and your family are mostly settled in your new house, begin to introduce your cat to your new home. Supervise him closely while he is exploring this unfamiliar environment.

You should make the relocation as stress-free as possible for your pet. Otherwise, you risk having your cat meow constantly and loudly, cry, hide, show aggression, and even attempt to escape from his new habitat.

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